DOTA 2 Review: A More Perfect Version! #Part2

Dynamic Interaction

One of the most interesting and amazing additional features of DOTA 2 is the fact that the hero you are currently using has its own “awareness” related to the battle environment that he encountered. Awareness? That’s right, if you are careful enough to listen to the pattern of conversations that glide like monologues of each character – then you will find that they often throw interactive comments with other characters, whether in the form of jokes or just insults.

No longer feels like an individual fighting alone, a feature like this leaves the impression that you are indeed engaged in a battle in a world that is connected to each other. Example? If Ursa succeeds in killing the Drow Ranger in the forest for example, then he will automatically mock Drow and claim to be the real ruler of the forest. This interaction also occurs when certain heroes manage to wear special items. As an example? Tinker will issue a comment “pewpewpew” when armed by Dagon. Little things like this make DOTA 2 look amazing compared to other MOBA games.

Some of the commands that you write in chat will also be translated as voice from the character you are using. Writing “Ty” will make your character say thank you, or just “lol” or “hahaha” to make them laugh instantly.

Free to Play – Without Implications on the Side of Gameplay

What is the meaning of a competitive game that brings massive team battles, if it is not present with a qualified hero balancing system. If only Valve or IceFrog is off guard and makes one or two heroes too over-power, then DOTA 2’s reputation as a fun competitive game will just collapse. This challenge is increasingly heavy considering that DOTA 2 will be distributed by Valve as a free to play game. The investment that continues to be raised during the development process and the growing number of servers along with increasing popularity makes Valve have to look for ways to benefit from concepts like this. Fortunately, this choice does not directly affect the existing gameplay side.

Video game development is not a charity work. This complex, resource-consuming process always leads to the same need: gain money and of course – profit from there. Valve seems to understand the consequences that must be faced from the free to play concept that they injected in DOTA 2. As a game that relies heavily on the balance of heroes in battle – imposing policies that look like “pay to win” is certainly a bad choice. Surviving what they promised from the beginning of the development process, they will also immediately ensure that all alternative heroes can be used from the start of the game, unlike some other MOBA games that require you to spend real money to open certain heroes. Therefore, the only way to get current profits lies only in the variants of cosmetic items offered.

With a store integrated in the game itself, you will see a myriad of equipment sets offered in a relatively friendly price range. For those who often taste DOTA 2, creating a more personal favorite character on the design side is of course a difficult offer to reject. Interestingly, Valve breaks down these equipment sets in a variety of separate items, allowing users to combine various equipment to create a more personalized design. Not just buying it at the store, you also have the opportunity to get each of these items randomly once you finish a battle.

Amazingly, Valve consistently “teases” you to buy these items with real money. Not only do you meet a team of friends or opponents who might wear it and look charming, you will also get a series of treasure chests that load these cool items randomly. Unfortunately, all these chests must be opened first with a key that can only be bought with real money – and will never fall randomly during battle. The more intense you play DOTA 2, the stronger your desire to buy these interesting items. A strategy that has so far proved quite successful.

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